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Friday, January 12, 2018
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‘The wind makes Karst people stay in, and gives them character’: walker and author Nick Hunt 12 Jan 7:28am ‘The wind makes Karst people stay in, and gives them character’: walker and author Nick Hunt
For the Stanford’s Travel Book of the Year nominee, the Bora wind influences every part of life on this wild plateau – straddling Italy and Slovenia – from the architecture to the inhabitants and their food
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Naples’ Fontanelle cemetery: skulls and silence beneath the busy city streets 12 Jan 5:00am Naples’ Fontanelle cemetery: skulls and silence beneath the busy city streets
In an underground chamber in the Italian city, the skulls of plague victims are stacked high but the traditions surrounding their preservation are ultimately uplifting, telling us a lot about the human capacity for caring Given the choice, most people would not enter a shadowy underground chamber stacked high with human skeletons. However, with an understanding of the Neapolitan fetish for skull iconography, a visit to Cimitero delle Fontanelle provides an unlikely calming and reflective antidote to Naples’ frenzied street life. The vast cemetery, dug deep into soft tufo stone, intersects with Neapolitan traditions of religion, folklore and pagan ritual – and is indicative of the many strata of the city’s history. The former quarry became a makeshift burial site in 1656 when a plague reduced the population from 400,000 to 150,000. According to tradition, being buried away from the consecrated soil of their parish church rendered the souls unable to reach heaven. Eternally dislocated from the afterlife, the chamber appears to embody the earthly manifestation of purgatory.
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Mysuru, India, city guide: what to see, plus the best yoga centres, hotels and restaurants 12 Jan 1:00am Mysuru, India, city guide: what to see, plus the best yoga centres, hotels and restaurants
Famed for ashtanga yoga, wellbeing is a way of life in this magical south Indian city – and fantastic markets, food and architecture all add to the allure Mysuru (formerly known as Mysore; it was renamed in 2014) has hovered under the tourist radar for years and is often overlooked in favour of southern cousins such as Kochi and Puducherry. But the former royal capital of the erstwhile eponymous princely state is a slow-reveal pleasure, a place of culture, eccentricity, architecture, beauty and manners; a gently pious, highly literate and quietly arresting city, connected to nature and imbued with the sacred.
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